SH-SCI Healthcare Lecture Series

SH-SCI Healthcare Lecture Series

Healthcare lectures for those with Spinal Cord Injury

As part of our Model System of care, we are striving to provide the best quality of information to our patients. In these efforts, we…

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Winter Adaptive Sports

Winter Adaptive Sports

The cold is here - let's give a cheer.... for Winter Sports!

  Don't let the snow and cold stop you from enjoying some awesome adaptive sports! Here we are with another great season of Spaulding's Adaptive…

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Technology in Spinal Cord Rehabilitation

Technology in Spinal Cord Rehabilitation

SH-SCI Model System is on the forefront of rehabilitation technology.

As featured on Chronicle, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital (SH-SCI Model System) is recognized to be on the forefront of rehabilitation technology.  

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Learn More about SH-SCI Research

Learn More about SH-SCI Research

Are you interested in learning more about what is happening at SH-SCI?

To learn more about research happening at SH-SCI - please contact us via our web form. We are happy to answer your questions!

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Improving Bone Health in SCI - Comparative Trial

Improving Bone Health in SCI - Comparative Trial

This study compares FES Rowing and Zoledronic Acid on bone loss in SCI.

People with serious spinal cord injuries run a high risk of bone fractures. This study aims to see if adapted rowing, using electrical stimulation of…

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Sclerostin and Bone Loss

Sclerostin and Bone Loss

Sclerostin is being investigated as a biomarker for bone loss in patients with SCI

This study looks at bone health in people with SCI to determine the relationship between certain proteins and bone loss during the acute phase of…

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Exercise and Breathlessness

Exercise and Breathlessness

Breathlessness (dyspnea) can result in decreased ability to perform ADLs or other activities - such as exercise.

Exercise and Breathlessness (SRH) In chronic SCI, muscular weakness and paralysis result in a decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs), and a…

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Non-Invasive Stimulation for Pain After SCI

Non-Invasive Stimulation for Pain After SCI

Researchers are looking at the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on pain.

This study is investigating a non-invasive method of brain stimulation (Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation- tDCS) for the relief of pain due to a previous spinal…

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SH-SCI Model System Team

The SH-SCI in Boston, MA has a diverse and active group of spinal cord injury clinicians and researchers. Our goal is to provide the best possible care for patients with spinal cord injury.

 

-- Click here to learn more about our SH-SCI Model System Program and Patient Care.

-- Click here to see more information on our SH-SCI team.

 

 

 

Adaptive Sports Program

The Adaptive Sports Program at SH-SCI provides therapeutic recreational activities – including sailing, rowing, bicycling, and skiing – for members of the disabled community. Our trained staff identifies activities most appropriate for each participant. For more information, please click here.

 

The Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) of Massachusetts also offers many selections for adaptive sports and summertime activities. Check out their brochure below!

 

icon DCR Universal Access Brochure

 

 

News

Knowledge In Motion - Neuroregenerative Properties of Dental Pulp in SCI

Our most recent Knowledge In Motion (K.I.M.) Lecture has been posted on the web! 

 

On January 30th the Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System and the New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center Model System hosted a lecture and webcast featuring Ricardo Battaglino PhD, from the Harvard School of Dental Medicine and The Forsyth Institute.  He discussed a new project in collaboration with Dr. Alpdogan Kantarci (Forsyth), Dr. Hatice Hasturk (Forsyth), and Dr. Leslie Morse (Spaulding-Harvard SCI Model System) to assess the neuroregenerative properties of dental pulp stem cells and their future potential to improve neurological outcomes in SCI.  We had a great attendance of over 70 consumers, and over 280 tuned in to the webcast from nine countries. Our consumers thought this topic was relevant, informative, and exiting!

 

Our attendees left with a new awareness about the source of dental pulp stem cells, how they are obtained, and how they can develop into elements of the nervous system.  The question and answer period was very interactive, many of the questions focused on how dental pulp stem cells might be used to promote neuro-recovery for people with spinal cord injury and related to real world situations.

 

Current Research Publications

  • Related Articles

    Neurotoxic or Neuroprotective? Current Controversies in SCI-Induced Autoimmunity.

    Curr Phys Med Rehabil Reports. 2013 Sep;1(3)

    Authors: Saltzman JW, Battaglino R, Stott H, Morse LR

    Abstract
    Controversy exists regarding the autoimmune response that has been observed following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). It is not clear if this represents a protective response by the immune system to prevent further tissue damage, a pathological reaction of the immune system to central nervous system antigens released by the injury, or a combination of both. Experimental evidence indicates that B cells produce auto-antibodies following SCI and that the presence of self-reactive antibodies is associated with tissue damage. Conversely, other studies suggest T cell activity at the site of the injury promotes tissue regeneration. Vaccination with dendritic cells exposed to central nervous s [...]

  • Related Articles

    Associations with chest illness and mortality in chronic spinal cord injury.

    J Spinal Cord Med. 2013 Jul 8;

    Authors: Danilack VA, Stolzmann KL, Gagnon DR, Brown R, Tun CG, Morse LR, Garshick E

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: Identify factors associated with chest illness and describe the relationship between chest illness and mortality in chronic spinal cord injury (SCI).
    DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey assessing chest illness and a prospective assessment of mortality.
    METHODS: Between 1994 and 2005, 430 persons with chronic SCI (mean ± SD), 52.0 ± 14.9 years old, and ≥4 years post SCI (20.5 ± 12.5 years) underwent spirometry, completed a health questionnaire, and reported any chest illness resulting in time off work, indoors, or in bed in the preceding 3 years. Deaths through 2007 were identified.
    OUTCOME MEASURES: Logistic regression assessing [...]

National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research

Our Spinal Cord Injury Model System is funded by the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). NIDRR is a component of the Department of Education - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) whose main mission is helping to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities.

 

National SCI Database

The National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures data from an estimated 13% of new SCI cases in the U.S.  As part of the SCI Model System, SH-SCI contributes to this database. The NSCISC has recently released 2013 "Facts and Figures" from the National Database.

NSCISC - Facts and Figures 2013

Knowledge Translation Center

Connect with the Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center
The Model System Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) has many resources available about the Spinal Cord Injury Model System, including helpful flyers and handouts about injury - and also the contact information for Model System sites nationwide.

On their website, they  list information for both consumers, and clinicians - including publications from the national sites. The MSKTC can also be found on Blogspot and Facebook.

Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System

SCI Resource of the Month

April 2014: Pressure Sores – Prevention and Care

This month, we focus on pressure sore prevention and care. After having a Spinal Cord Injury you are at high risk of developing skin problems and pressure sores. Limited mobility coupled with impaired sensation can lead to these complications. Pressure sores can cause serious infections and should not be ignored. In our resource article linked, we cover essential information on pressure sores, and how to prevent and treat them. 

Here is the page for our pressure sore resource. Additional pamphlets on other topics may be found in our "Patient Handouts" section of the website.

icon April 2014: Pressure Sores – Prevention and Care icon Pressure Sore Prevention